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Sep
27

Does anyone know how to grow your own herds?  In suspect that all commercially grown herbs and spices at potentially treated with insectides and herbacies.  Also, it seems that growing and making spices is a lost art, at least in western societies.  I have never seen most of the spices I use in their fresh state.

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By Thomas B
9/27/2010 3:11:22 AM

You could start with some veru easy to grow, easy to get spices such as chillies and pepercorns.  The pink pepercorn is a large tree and common in many street plantings.  It will take a few years to grow but the pink pepercorns taste much the same as black pepercorns.

Chillie plants are easy to grow and find at your local nursery.  There are many varieties around too.  They are easily grown in pots and are an annual in southern Australia or short lived in frost free climates. 

Ginger also has many species.  They need protection from the hot sun and grow best in humidity.  If you pick it when the young roots are green, they can be peeled and used.  Otherwise wait for it to mature and become the knobbly variety we see in the green grocer today.  You can get the rhizomes for planting from your local green grocer but chose a thin skinned variety. 

Tumeric resembles ginger.  I have seem tumeric rhizomes at the green grocer too, although aren't stocked by most green grocers.  The fresh stuff is more potent and should be used in smaller quanties than the dried stuff you get from the supermarket. 

Unfortunately you are unlikely to be able to grow vanilla unless you live in the tropics. 

Cinnamon on the other hand can occassionally be found at the nursery but again it prefers a warmer climate. 

Another easy to grow spice is mustard seeds.  Again it is an annual in termperate climates and can grown in pots.  

Good luck, we grown all our herbs and some of our spices.  It really makes a difference to the taste of food.   

By Thomas B
9/27/2010 3:11:25 AM

You could start with some veru easy to grow, easy to get spices such as chillies and pepercorns.  The pink pepercorn is a large tree and common in many street plantings.  It will take a few years to grow but the pink pepercorns taste much the same as black pepercorns.

Chillie plants are easy to grow and find at your local nursery.  There are many varieties around too.  They are easily grown in pots and are an annual in southern Australia or short lived in frost free climates. 

Ginger also has many species.  They need protection from the hot sun and grow best in humidity.  If you pick it when the young roots are green, they can be peeled and used.  Otherwise wait for it to mature and become the knobbly variety we see in the green grocer today.  You can get the rhizomes for planting from your local green grocer but chose a thin skinned variety. 

Tumeric resembles ginger.  I have seem tumeric rhizomes at the green grocer too, although aren't stocked by most green grocers.  The fresh stuff is more potent and should be used in smaller quanties than the dried stuff you get from the supermarket. 

Unfortunately you are unlikely to be able to grow vanilla unless you live in the tropics. 

Cinnamon on the other hand can occassionally be found at the nursery but again it prefers a warmer climate. 

Another easy to grow spice is mustard seeds.  Again it is an annual in termperate climates and can grown in pots.  

Good luck, we grown all our herbs and some of our spices.  It really makes a difference to the taste of food.   

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